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Benefits

Note

This is only a guide and may not cover every circumstance of each particular benefit and it has no status in law. It does not cover all the rules in the benefit schemes nor does it provide a full interpretation of the rules. So it should not be treated as a complete and authoritative statement of the law.

Death Grant

Death Grant is a grant of £600 paid to a person who incurs the cost of the funeral or other appreciable expenses connected with the death of an insured person, or on the death of the husband, wife, civil partner, widower, widow, surviving civil partner or a child of an insured person. Subject to satisfying the contribution conditions the full grant of £600 is payable or reduced rates may be payable.

Industrial Accident - Disablement Benefit

Disablement Benefit is a regular monthly payment or lump sum awarded for any disability, which remains, when an Injury Benefit ends. The amount of benefit depends on the extent of your disablement as assessed by a medical board. For a disablement of less than 35% you may receive a lump sum. The amounts payable vary from £510 for 1%, to £8,560 for 34%.

If the disablement is 35% or more a pension of up to £381.23 per month may be paid. If the medical board considers that the disablement is permanent or for not less than seven years, instead of the pension, a lump sum may be paid. The amount payable varies from £8,890 for 35%, to £24,770 for 100%. The monthly rate of Disablement Pension can be increased for certain dependants.

In addition free medical treatment for employment injuries or occupational diseases, including the provision and renewal of prosthetic appliances, is provided at the government hospital.

Guardian’s Allowance

Guardian’s Allowance is a payment of £118.35 month to the person who takes into his family an orphan child both of whose parents are dead. The deceased parents or step-parents must have paid or been credited with enough social insurance contributions in order for the Guardian's Allowance to be awarded. Special rules apply to the children of divorced parents, adopted children, illegitimate children and children whose parents cannot be traced.

Industrial Accident or Disease - Industrial Death Benefit

If an accident or disease results in death, death benefit is payable to the dependants of the deceased person. Death Benefit is payable by way of pension to the widow, widower, surviving civil partner or wholly dependent parent of an insured person, whose death results from an industrial accident or a prescribed occupational disease. The pension is payable at the rate of £234.03 per month and may be increased by dependant’s allowance.

Where there is no widow, widower, surviving civil partner, children or parent, there is provision for certain other dependants to claim, in which case the benefit is by way of a gratuity of £2,770.

In addition free medical treatment for employment injuries or occupational diseases, including the provision and renewal of prosthetic appliances, is provided at the government hospital.

Injury Benefit

The Employment Injuries Insurance Scheme provides insurance against being unable to work, being disabled or losing life because of an accident at work or certain industrial diseases. The standard rate of Injury Benefit is £87.64 a week with lower rates for persons who are under 18 years of age. Additional weekly allowances are also payable for an adult dependant and two children.
Injury Benefit is paid for a maximum period of 26 weeks from the date of the accident or development of an occupational disease.

In addition free medical treatment for employment injuries or occupational diseases, including the provision and renewal of prosthetic appliances, is provided at the government hospital.

Maternity Allowance

Maternity Allowance is a weekly allowance paid to a woman who is on maternity leave and is normally paid for 18 weeks, starting from 11 weeks before the expected week of the birth, but not for any period when paid work is done.

Maternity Allowance can only be paid by virtue of the woman's own insurance record and she must have exercised her right to maternity leave in accordance with the Employment (Maternity and Parental Leave, and Health and Safety) Regulations.

The contribution conditions are that:-

(a) she has paid social insurance contributions as an employed person under the Social Security (Insurance) Act for at least 26 weeks in the 52-week period ending on the 15th week before the expected date of confinement.

The contribution conditions for a self-employed woman are that:-

(a) she has paid contributions as a self-employed person under the Social Security (Insurance) Act for at least 26 weeks in the 52-week period ending in the 15th week before the expected week of confinement; and

(b) she has paid the additional voluntary contributions for this purpose as set out under the Social Security (Insurance) Act for at least 26 weeks in the 52-week period ending in the 15th week before the expected week of confinement.

Maternity Grant

Maternity Grant is a grant of £700 paid to a woman for every child born to her. If she is confined of twins or a greater number of children, she will be paid £700 for each child.The benefit may be paid on either the mother's own insurance or her husband's or civil partner, but not on both. Subject to satisfying the contribution conditions, the full grant of £700 is payable or reduced rates may apply.

There are two contribution conditions that must be satisfied. These are:

(a) that at least 52 social insurance contributions have been paid between the date of becoming first insured and the date of the confinement; and

(b) that at least 40 social insurance contributions must have been paid or credited in the last contribution year before the year in which the confinement takes place. Reduced rates of benefit may be payable if at least 13 contributions have been paid or credited in the appropriate contribution year.

Old Age Pension

Old Age Pension is a monthly payment made to a person who has paid or been credited with enough social insurance contributions during their working life. In the case of a woman a working life is from 20yrs to 60yrs (i.e. 40yrs) and in the case of a man from 20yrs to 65yrs (i.e. 45yrs). As the law stands today, pensionable age is 60 for a woman and 65 for a man.

In order for a man to obtain the full rate of pension a total of 2250 social insurance contributions is required as opposed to 585 social insurance contributions for a minimum pension.

A woman requires a total of 2000 social insurance contributions to obtain a full pension and 520 social insurance contributions for a minimum pension.

The amount of pension received depends on the number of contributions paid or credited by the insured person. The most you can get is £463.75 per month and the minimum is £120.35 per month.

You will not receive your Old Age Pension automatically on reaching pensionable age. You need to make a claim and this can be done up to four months before reaching pension age.

Unemployment Benefit

The Social Security (Non-Contributory Benefits and Unemployment Insurance) Act covers the entitlement and payment of Unemployment Benefit to unemployed persons previously in employment. Payment of benefit is financed by the weekly contributions made by employers and insured persons to the Statutory Benefits Fund.

Unemployment Benefit is a weekly payment made to any contributor (other than a self-employed person) who is unemployed, capable and available for work. Being available for work is a basic condition for anyone claiming Unemployment Benefit. This benefit is not payable to persons over age 65 (men) and age 60 (women). The contribution conditions for entitlement are as follows:

(a) during the 52 weeks immediately preceding the claim not less than thirty contributions had been paid; or

(b) The yearly average of contributions paid or credited to that person is not less than thirty.

The standard weekly rate is £62.70 with an increase of £30.80 a week for any one adult dependant and £14.30 a week for each child. The weekly rate payable to young persons (i.e. over age15 but under age 18) without dependants is £30.80.

Survivor’s Benefit

Survivor’s benefit is payable to the surviving spouse or surviving civil partner of a deceased insured person who has satisfied the necessary contribution conditions. Subject to satisfying the necessary contribution conditions the standard rate is payable or reduced rates may be payable. There are three types of Survivor’s Benefit, only one of which is payable at any one time, as follows:

1. Survivor’s Bereavement Allowance

Survivor’s Bereavement Allowance, which is payable for the first 3 months following the deceased spouse's or civil partner's death. The most you can get is £550.05 per month and the minimum is £142.65 per month, with increases of £67.05 per month for each child up to a maximum of four children.

2. Widowed Parent’s Allowance

Widowed Parent’s Allowance, which is payable to the surviving spouse or surviving civil partner left with a dependent child on termination of the Survivor’s Bereavement allowance. The most you can get is £463.75 per month and the minimum is £120.35 per month, with increases of £67.05 per month for each dependent child.

3. Survivor’s Pension

Survivor’s Pension, which is payable to the surviving spouse or surviving civil partner, if on termination of the Survivor's Bereavement Allowance or the Widowed Parent’s Allowance, the surviving spouse or surviving civil partner is over the age of 40 and under pensionable age. The most you can get is £463.75 per month and the minimum is £120.35 per month, with increases of £67.05 per month for each child up to a maximum of four children.